discommon

discommon
\\də̇s, (ˈ)dis+\ transitive verb
Etymology: Middle English discomenen, from dis- (I) + comen, commun common (n.) — more at common
1. obsolete : to exclude or banish from a community of interest; specifically : to deprive of citizenship or of church fellowship
2. at Oxford and Cambridge Universities : to forbid (a tradesman) to deal with undergraduates
3.
a. : to deprive of the right of common (as of pasture)
b. : to deprive of commonable quality (as land by enclosing it)

Useful english dictionary. 2012.

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Look at other dictionaries:

  • Discommon — Dis*com mon, v. t. 1. To deprive of the right of common. [R.] Bp. Hall. [1913 Webster] 2. To deprive of privileges. [R.] T. Warton. [1913 Webster] 3. (Law) To deprive of commonable quality, as lands, by inclosing or appropriating. Burrill. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • discommon — /dis kom euhn/, v.t. 1. (at Oxford and Cambridge) to prohibit (tradespeople or townspeople who have violated the regulations of the university) from dealing with the undergraduates. 2. Law. to deprive of the character of a common, as by enclosing …   Universalium

  • discommon — dis·common …   English syllables

  • discommon — /diskoman/ To deprive commonable lands of their commonable quality, by inclosing and appropriating or improving them …   Black's law dictionary

  • discommon — /diskoman/ To deprive commonable lands of their commonable quality, by inclosing and appropriating or improving them …   Black's law dictionary

  • discommon — To deprive of a right of common; to change common property into private property …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • appropriare et includere communiam — To appropriate and enclose a common; to discommon …   Ballentine's law dictionary

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